How to Handle Multiple Windows in Selenium

Multiple windows are a common occurrence in day-to-day web testing. They come up when an application has different windows or tabs, and you need to test the UI in each one.

Instead of re-running the same test over and over again, you can handle multiple windows in Selenium.

By keeping your tests flexible, you can reduce the amount of rework and keep your testing workflow efficient. In this blog post, you’ll learn how to handle multiple windows in Selenium and maintain your test workflow.

What Is Selenium?

Selenium is a framework for driving web-based applications. It’s a collection of tools that make it easy to write tests for web applications, including the ability to simulate user interactions.

The main reason you’d want to use Selenium is to write automated tests for your application. An automated test is a script that is run a certain number of times and then is stopped. If all of the scripts pass, then that means the application works. If any of the scripts fail, then you’ll know about it.

A tool like Selenium provides many benefits, one of which is that you don’t have to know the specific code that runs behind your application. You don’t have to know the exact settings or structure of the application you’re testing. You just have to know the code.

How to Handle Multiple Windows in Selenium

The first step to handling multiple windows in Selenium is to make sure you have a method for testing the application’s functionality in each window. When you write your test, you’ll just have to set up the functionality in each window and then execute the test.

Let’s say you have an application that lets users add a post to a blog. The interface has two windows – one for creating the post and one for viewing the post. It’s important that you test the functionality of both windows.

To test functionality in both windows, you just need to write a test that creates a post in one window and then creates a link to the post in the other window.

The Problem with Handling Multiple Windows

There are a few problems with this approach. The first is that you have to duplicate the code for each test. You have to write a test that creates the post in one window and then link it to the other window.

It’s not a big deal if there’s only one test like this, but as your application grows, this will become a huge problem. You’ll have more tests that have to create and link to the same thing. When that happens, the tests will become harder to read and maintain.

Another problem is that you have to write two versions of each test. The first version creates the functionality in the first window, and then the second version links it to the other window.

Imagine if you had dozens of tests like this. You’d have to write two versions of each test, which is tedious and error-prone. The more you handle multiple windows, the more you’ll see these issues. The only way around these issues is to handle multiple windows in Selenium.

Handling Multiple Windows with Selenium WebDriver

Luckily, there is a way to handle multiple windows in Selenium. The method for doing this is to use a feature in Selenium called WebDriver.

This feature gives you the ability to simulate a user’s actions inside your tests. For example, you can simulate a user clicking a button and then clicking another button. This way, you don’t have to know the exact code that runs behind your application. You just have to know the code inside your tests.

With WebDriver, you can simulate a user clicking buttons and then clicking links. You don’t have to know how your application works to do this – you just have to know the code.

WebDriver has a feature called “click navigation” that lets you simulate links and clicks. This allows you to handle multiple windows in Selenium.

Wrapping Up

When there are multiple windows in your application, you’ll want to use a feature in Selenium called WebDriver. This feature lets you simulate a user’s actions in your tests, and it allows you to handle multiple windows in Selenium.

You can get more out of your tests by using WebDriver to handle multiple windows. You’ll write fewer tests that create the same link or button. You’ll write fewer tests, so they’ll be easier to read and maintain. These are all reasons why you should handle multiple windows in Selenium.

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